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Search results for: Andrew Whiten

Chimpanzees ape their peers

CAPTION: Techniques were passed on throughout communities through observation. CREDIT: Drawing by Amy Whiten.

Apes ‘ape’ more rationally than humans

When we describe someone 'aping' someone else, it implies they are mindlessly copying them. This does apes a disservice, according to a recent study by scientists from the University of St Andrews. In fact, it's the young members of our own species who are more likely to 'ape' their elders without too much thought.

A virtual field trip into the wild

CAPTION: A screen capture of the computer simulation which will allow visitors to make a lightning "virtual field trip" to two different wild chimpanzee communities. CREDIT: Steve Smart

Do humans ‘own’ culture?

Experts in evolution and animal behaviour will gather next week to debate whether chimpanzee 'culture' is any less real than human culture - the outcome of which may lead to a rethink of the human evolution process.

Child vs chimp

A primate expert has developed an innovative technique which is providing the first clear evidence that children and chimpanzees learn the traditions of the community they live in by similar processes of imitation.